ICE ICE Baby

(Explanation of how I’m not a Vanilla Ice fan for you non-Cyberpunkers.)

The inestimable Psychochild wants to know if we like Cyberpunk. We do!

If yes, goto Wintermute’s Processing Core (okay, The Internet Crashed) and check out the site.

Ethic and Ferrel are apparently also involved.

Has everyone known about this but me? This is a possibility. I’ve had my head up my RL arse of late.

Short sentences are the meat and gristle of cyberpunk, by the way.

And if you want to refresh your reading, try some of William Gibson’s newer stuff. I’m a fan for life. Also a good interview by, of all people, Amazon.

Today’s post is brought to you by Links Gone Mad! And the letter C and the number 3.

(With thanks to whoever created the image above.)

PS – What are you reading these days? I just took a look at my current selection and had to congratulate myself on my eclecticism: A. Lincoln (Ronald C. White), The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest (Steig Larsson), Conspirator (C.J. Cherryh), and 206 Bones (Kathy Reichs).

The first is excellent — I’m no Lincoln expert but I do love a good biography. The second is a crime novel and beyond excellent (but note it’s the third — and last — in a series). The third should need no introduction to most readers here — I’ve been a fan of Cherryh for over 20 years and have probably read just about everything she ever published (including the stuff that’s now out of print). Hell, I even based a tabletop RPG on one of her series. And the last is a series I got into because of the TV show, only to discover that while it’s almost nothing like the show, which has deviated a great deal from the original books, they’re still cracking good stories. Who’da thunk forensics could be so interesting?

9 thoughts on “ICE ICE Baby

  1. I’m currently reading Richard Morgan’s Thirteen, having recently completed Iain M Banks Transition (not sure I really liked it) and Charles Stross’ Halting State (interesting take on where online gaming could be heading.)

    And speaking of Gibson, I have Spook Country sitting on the shelf ready to go once I’ve finished Thirteen. Not sure that one fits into the Cyberpunk mold though.

    Then it’s time to hit Amazon once again and build the pile up.

    • Last Banks thing I read was Matter, and I wasn’t overly impressed. Which is a shame, because his early stuff (Consider Phlebas, The Player of Games, etc) was absolutely excellent — not to mention the Iain Banks stuff like the Wasp Factory and the Crow Road.

      Haven’t heard of Morgan – thanks for the tip! :D

      As for Spook Country — Gibson readily admits that the world has caught up with his cyberpunk and that it’s morphed into something else. He’s still one of the best writers out there for my money.

      • For pure Morgan SciFi, try the Takeshi Kovacs series starting with Altered Carbon. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeshi_Kovacs It can get a little rough, in language and violence, though — but I think you’re okay with that from our conversations.

        I read Matter as my second Banks novel with Excession being the first some years ago, and did enjoy it. I’ve since read Phlebas, Player of Games, and Use of Weapons and was impressed by each. I do like the little twists he puts at the end.

        Another author I really like is Alastair Reynolds. He did a three book series starting with Revelation Space, but there is a gem of a standalone in the same universe called Chasm City and a superb two novella book called Diamond Dogs/Turqoise Days that I rave about. Unfortunately I lent it to someone and it hasn’t come back. Well worth a look, all of them.

  2. “William Gibson [...] I’m a fan for life.”

    ‘The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel.’

    Bam. First line. Hooked forevermore. How could one not be?

    Funnily enough I’ve just finished reading Johnny Mnemonic and the Sprawl trilogy, followed by 1984. Probably should read something about fluffy kittens next to balance things out.

    • Heh — everyone goes on about how dreary and dystopian and pessimistic cyberpunk is, including stuff like the Spawl trilogy. Oddly enough I found the Bridge books (Virtual Light etc.) far more pessimistic than the Sprawl stuff, in which the protagonists are constantly kicking against The Man (and were more readily identifiable-with, at least for me). And it can’t just have been a youth thing – I re-read the Sprawl books myself a couple of years ago.

  3. Stop! Collaborate and listen. Oh, wait, not Vanilla, as you were…

    I’d definitely start with Altered Carbon for Richard Morgan, I wasn’t as much of a fan of Black Man (published as Thirteen in the US); he’s moved onto fantasy now with The Steel Remains which is pretty good too.

    Alastair Reynolds is a great shout too, generally hard-ish SF space opera, Chasm City is really good and has lashings of noir.

    Personally I’m on a Cold War bender, having discovered abebooks.co.uk which allowed me to pick up a bunch of out-of-print Anthony Price books, he’s rather excellent.

  4. Ooh, nice list of books. I’ve been meaning to read more Iain Banks; glad to know I should stick with the earlier work.

    I’ve been diving into more movies thanks to Netflix. Catching up on some more obscure cyberpunk-themed movies. I really should read more Charlie Stross, though; I met him at a conference last year and he’s a really great guy.

    Ysharros wrote:
    Has everyone known about this but me? This is a possibility. I’ve had my head up my RL arse of late.

    Maybe. I posted about wanting a literate helper on my blog a little while ago. Ferrel and Ethic expressed interested. Ethic in particular has been a tremendous help! :)

    Anyway, thanks for the pointer, Ysharros. Hope you enjoy the site. :)

  5. Cyberpunk is soooo 90s … /duck

    Seriously, William Gibson is a really great science fiction writer and I do need to go back and do some read throughs since it has been an awful long time since the last.

    Sorry, I am drunk-posting. I just hit KISA, let’s see who else can fall to my mighty Tecate-blade! Mexican beer FTW!

    PS: I am currently double-teaming: Plato Through Homer by Zdravko Planinc and Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey: A Biography by Alberto Manguel. Top-notch stuff!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s